Fingers Crossed

Yesterday I submitted my portfolio for submission into the  Art Education Program. So I thought I would share my images, artist statement and letter of intent for teaching:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Artist Statement

For me, art is created to serve a functional purpose. Whether to address an argument, raise awareness about an issue, depict a memory, or reflect my future dreams, art puts reality into a new perspective. Beauty may be one of these purposes, but it is in the eye of the beholder and sometimes the function takes precedence over physical appearance. More often than not, I have a specific function or goal in mind for the work I create rather than generating art without concept.

Preparing for the Art Education program allows me to experience an assortment of courses which leads me to create through a variety of mediums. Drawing and painting serve to develop foundational skills of working from observation, whereas design and ceramics allow me to work three dimensionally from imagination. However, photography is what I am most passionate about, as the lens captures pieces of life in the purest form. Whether that may bring back positive or negative suggestions, it allows the viewer to vividly relive moments again and again.

My recent artwork is rooted in the connections between people, as it is a recurring theme in every piece of work I do. This concept is based on the social norms of strangers I see every day and the relationships I hold with the people that are dear to me. With the advancement of technology, overloaded calendars, and a highly individualistic culture, our sense of genuine community has been lost. My desire is to encourage honesty and tenderness into our world, in hopes that viewers will be more aware of the importance of the ties that they hold with one another.

 

Letter of Intent:

I have, for many years, found such joy in caring for younger children within the realm of multiple church activities, summer camps, and steady babysitting opportunities all throughout high school. Now, being an Extended School Day instructor at Mc Nair Elementary School, I have gained even more experience with children. As an extension of their normal school day, we play games, apply academic enrichment, and produce two to three crafts a week. The variety of activities we plan has given me direct practice on how to create art lessons and see how well the children do.

To me, the most important rationale for art education is to provide a feel-good activity for the children. I believe that raising a child’s self-esteem through art will give them the confidence they desperately need to combat the negativity that probably will surround them in other areas of their life. I want to provide art lessons that produce a guaranteed success, so that no child will ever feel inadequate in comparison to their classmates. However, I want them to feel proud of what they create and for them to go home and share their achievements with their families. I feel that a balanced amount of the activities should focus on the growth and learning processes that are weaved into the unit as a whole rather than on the final product of piece of art.

I believe that especially for young children, the development of cognitive abilities and psychomotor skills can easily spill over to other areas of academic learning.  The practice of art making can accelerate the development of fine-motor skills and lead to a foundation of creative learning. Incorporating aspects of math, literature, history, science, and new media into the art classroom can intensify the absorption of knowledge to the student.  This incorporation of other disciplines can be taught in a inventive and interactive way, with a hands-on approach.

About these ads

2 Comments

Filed under Artsy Fartsy, School

2 responses to “Fingers Crossed

  1. Casey

    This is really great, Mary!!! Good luck! :)

  2. Casey

    This is really great, Mary! Good luck!!! :)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s